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Diseases

  • Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 2, 2002

    Eastern equine encephalitis, also known as sleeping sickness, is a viral disease that affects horses, some other animals, and humans. EEE occurs in the eastern half of the United States, most commonly on the eastern seaboard and the Gulf coast. It is also found in Central and South Americaand the Caribbean. A similar disease, western equine encephalitis (WEE) is present in the western United States.

  • Equine Arthritis, A Pain in the Joint

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 2, 2002

    Acute arthritis can be caused by injury or by bacterial or viral infection. Chronic arthritis is often osteoarthritis that results from the cumulative effects of day-to-day activity and stress. Old injuries, joint infections, and years of training and performance can all lead to the development of joint pain and stiffness. Poor conformation, hoof deformities, and problems with trimming or shoeing are other contributing factors. Probably there is some genetic influence also.

  • Cushing’s Disease Threatens the Health of the Older Horse

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 2, 2002

    Because of the predisposition for sole abscesses and laminitis, strict attention must be paid to hoof care. Regular trimming or shoeing at four- to six-week intervals is imperative. All attempts to reduce the likelihood of laminitis should be implemented, including gradual changes in diet and limited exposure to carbohydrate-rich spring pastures. On the veterinary front, regular deworming is paramount.

  • Cushing’s Disease Threatens the Health of the Older Horse

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 2, 2002

    Because of the predisposition for sole abscesses and laminitis, strict attention must be paid to hoof care. Regular trimming or shoeing at four- to six-week intervals is imperative. All attempts to reduce the likelihood of laminitis should be implemented, including gradual changes in diet and limited exposure to carbohydrate-rich spring pastures. On the veterinary front, regular deworming is paramount.

  • MRLS Still a Conundrum One Year after Outbreak

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 2, 2002

    A constellation of the finest scientists-veterinarians, agronomists, toxicologists, arborists, nutritionists, entomologists, meteorologists, and epidemiologists from all over the world-remain baffled a year after the onset of the crippling economic and emotional war waged in central Kentucky and its surrounding lands, the mecca of Thoroughbred breeding.

  • Nutrition for Horses with Metabolic Disorders

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Proper nutrition is extremely important in managing horses with metabolic disorders. Regulating the amount and type of feed, with special attention to carbohydrates, allows many horses to show minimal disease signs, maintain healthy body condition, stay comfortable, and safely perform exercise.

  • Avoid Risks from Fumonisin in Corn

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Unlike some fungus or mold species that cause problems in stored grain, Fusarium grows on corn plants before they are harvested. Stress from weather or insect damage can make plants more susceptible.

  • Recovery from Enteritis Dictates Changes in Feed Management

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Enteritis is an inflammation of the small intestine. More specifically, anterior (or proximal) enteritis affects the duodenum and jejunum, sections of the small intestine anatomically closest to the stomach.

  • Equine Nutritionist Q&A: Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis

    By KER Staff · October 27, 2001

    <p> Can I do anything nutritionally to continue to help my horse recover from&nbsp; Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis?</p>

  • Gastric Ulcers in Horses: A Widespread but Manageable Disease

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 17, 1999

    Every equine practitioner appreciates the delicate nature of the equine gut. Problems related to the small intestine and large intestine are well understood and routinely treated. What may be surprising to many is how often the stomach is affected. Specifically, the incidence of gastric ulcers is extremely high, particularly in performance horses.

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