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Digestive/GI

  • How Sweet It Is: A Molasses Primer

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 8, 2002

    Manufacturers of horse feeds use molasses to improve palatability, reduce dustiness, eliminate or decrease sorting of certain components in a textured feed, aid in the pelleting process, improve mixing integrity of a concentrate, and add nutrients or other ingredients to a ration.

  • Yeast Supplementation and Soybean Hulls Studied

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    In an effort to determine the effect of yeast on digestion in horses, researchers in France carried out a study to look at the influence of feeding a preparation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a strain of yeast, on microbial profiles and fermentation patterns in the large intestine of horses fed a high fiber or a high starch diet.

  • Nutrition for Horses with Metabolic Disorders

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Proper nutrition is extremely important in managing horses with metabolic disorders. Regulating the amount and type of feed, with special attention to carbohydrates, allows many horses to show minimal disease signs, maintain healthy body condition, stay comfortable, and safely perform exercise.

  • Avoid Risks from Fumonisin in Corn

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Unlike some fungus or mold species that cause problems in stored grain, Fusarium grows on corn plants before they are harvested. Stress from weather or insect damage can make plants more susceptible.

  • Feeding the Miniature Horse

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Regardless of their size, all equines have the same basic nutritional needs. Each animal must consume enough water, forage, and (possibly) grain to meet the requirements of growth, tissue repair, reproduction, exercise, and maintenance of all body systems. Factors such as body size, age, breed, work, climate, health status, and metabolism affect the type and amount of hay, pasture, and grain a particular horse should be given.

  • Feeding the Horse Following Anterior Enteritis

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Depending upon the severity of the disease, horses may have to receive nutrition parenterally (intravenously) during treatment. This is particularly true if a bout of anterior enteritis lasts longer than three or four days.

  • Forage Forms

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Forage remains the primary constituent of most well-balanced equine diets, but nowadays it can be proffered in a multitude of forms, from traditional long-stemmed hay to symmetrical cubes. The five most common forage forms are pasture, hay, cubes, pellets, and haylage.

  • Determining Work Intensity

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Optimal nutrition of the performance horse hinges foremost on the exercise it performs. Just as the diet of a human bodybuilder is dissimilar to that of a marathon runner, horses are fed with performance goals in mind.

  • Feeding the Mare and Foal after Weaning

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Weaning is a stressful time for foals and mares. While mares are often ready to say good-bye to their rambunctious, rowdy charges, foals can be far more fretful. As such, weaning rarely negatively impacts a mare. In fact, some mares may blossom and begin to flesh out once they are freed from the burden of milk production.

  • Feeding the Mare and Foal after Weaning

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Weaning is a stressful time for foals and mares. While mares are often ready to say good-bye to their rambunctious, rowdy charges, foals can be far more fretful. As such, weaning rarely negatively impacts a mare. In fact, some mares may blossom and begin to flesh out once they are freed from the burden of milk production.

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