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Feed Ingredients

  • The Nitty Gritty on Salt

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 4, 2003

    The most popular way to feed salt ad libitum is a salt block. These were originally designed for cattle, which possess a rough tongue, but are suitable for most horses. Occasionally a horse may be seen biting or gnawing at the corners of the block.

  • Cutting Horse Feeds with Cereal Grains and Protein Supplements

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 4, 2003

    Random blending of whole grains or protein supplements with commercially manufactured feeds can skew the nutritional balance of feeds and induce growth problems in young horses. The best way to ensure sound nutrition and thus favorable growth, performance, and production is to choose a fortified feed that best complements the nutritional profile of the intended forage and the proposed use of the horse.

  • Feeding Horses in Australia and New Zealand

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 4, 2003

    The components of a typical diet for horses in Australia and New Zealand may seem an unlikely lot. Lupins, tick beans, and copra meal are certainly not common in the vernacular of the horse community in North America. Nutritionists have adapted these native, though seemingly unusual, ingredients into well-balanced rations that support growth, performance, and reproduction.

  • Animal Feed Imports Increasing

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 1, 2003

    Figures released by the USDA and the United Nations show that North African and Middle Eastern countries have steadily increased imports of animal feeds in the last decade.

  • Equine Nutritionist Q&A: Super Fibers for Horses

    By KER Staff · October 27, 2003

    <p> What are super fibers, and what are the benefits of feeding them?</p>

  • Equine Nutritionist Q&A: Silage for Horses

    By KER Staff · October 27, 2003

    <p> What&rsquo;s the difference between silage and haylage and is it beneficial to horses?</p>

  • Managing Broodmares on Fescue Hay or Pasture

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 17, 2002

    For mares with known or suspected fescue exposure, managers should be sure the foaling is attended and a veterinarian is available. This is recommended even if mares have been treated with domperidone or fluphenazine. The attendant may need to cut the thickened placenta or help the mare expel a very large foal that is several weeks overdue.

  • Digestive Aids: Does Your Horse Need Them?

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 10, 2002

    Products defined as digestive aids can be broadly categorized as either probiotics or prebiotics. These aids can be fed as part of the horse's regular diet, or administered only occasionally in response to a particular need.

  • Why Horse Supplements?

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 10, 2002

    Do not choose supplements on price alone, but look for economical products that meet actual needs. A concentrated, low inclusion product will be more expensive than one in which the dose is larger. Look at the weight of the pack and the dosage amount, not the size of the bucket.

  • Supplements to Help the Endurance Horse

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 10, 2002

    Keeping an endurance horse fit and healthy involves more than just putting in a large number of miles on trails. The work required of these horses is quite different than that of any other equine athlete. The challenge is to provide the correct combination of nutrients that will support the special needs of these athletes during both training and competition.

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